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Kids find Mom 34 years after being told she was dead

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UD_student:
Since this is a non-international abduction, I thought I would put it here. For now, it seems to have a much happier ending that the woman who found her teenage kids on facebook although missing 34 years of your children's lives is unbelievably cruel.

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/38623161/ns/today-today_people/

For 34 years, she thought her children were dead
Now she is reunited with son and daughter she thought were killed in crash

By John Springer

 For 34 years, Victoria Rohring wasn’t quite sure what to believe about what really happened to the daughter and son she was told in a mysterious phone call had perished in a car crash in October 1976.

Rohring’s initial instinct was that she was being lied to by the family of Jimmy Black, whom the caller claimed was critically injured in the same crash. Rohring had divorced Black a month earlier after a stormy marriage that produced two children: Scott, 5, and Karen, 7.

As the years went by and private investigators hired by Rohring could not find Black or the children, the heartbroken mother slowly accepted the fact that she might never see her kids again.

But that all changed one afternoon early this summer when the telephone rang at Rohring’s home in Rochester, N.Y. A woman claiming to be helping Scott Black find his long-lost mother said Black would call Rohring that night.

Upset yet intrigued, Rohring dismissed the call as a cruel prank — until she heard the voice of her son on the phone later that night.

“I will never lose my children again. Never. Never,” Rohring, now 63, told TODAY’s Matt Lauer on Monday.

The children Rohring had long feared were dead sat by their mother’s side as she recounted their emotional reunion last month.

Rohring didn’t recognize Scott and Karen (now Karen Cason) when she pulled up to Scott’s home in Georgia, but the tears sown from mother-child bonds formed more than a third of a century earlier blossomed freely that day.

As Rohring, Black and Cason told Lauer, the reunion was made possible with the help of an ad on Craigslist, and because all three questioned things they were told over the years about why Rohring was no longer part of her children’s lives.

“In some ways, it must feel like life has begun again,” Lauer observed.

“Yes, it has,” Scott Black agreed. “You live your whole life being told one thing and then you find something else, and the person who was taken away from you at an early age, you finally get them back.”

Ever-changing story
According to Rohring’s children, Jimmy Black gave them conflicting accounts about their mother as they grew up. They say that the stories shifted so much that over time they just didn’t accept them any more.

“My father would always tell me different stories,” Karen Cason recalled. “My father said, ‘I told your mom you were dead. She’s in the Army. She’s in the Peace Corps.’ His story always changed.”

Jimmy Black, who today rents a room in the back of Scott Black’s home, told a TODAY producer by phone that his ex-wife stopped calling about her children after the divorce was final. He denied having any knowledge about anyone calling Rohring back in October 1976 claiming that her children were dead.

But after being separated from their mother for so long, Scott and Karen are less interested in the whys and wherefores than in catching up with lost time and looking ahead.

“Both parents have their own version of the story. I have to give her the benefit of the doubt. I have to give him the benefit of the doubt,” Scott Black said. “But when she tells me the story ... it always seems to be the same. Over the past 30 years when I asked him the story, it always changed.”

Choking back emotion, Rohring said she made it clear to both her children when they reunited in Atlanta last month that she never abandoned them.

“I said, ‘If I did not love you, and I abandoned you and left you on your dad’s doorstep, it would have been very easy for me to say ... ‘I’m not the Victoria you are looking for.’ ”

Although both Scott and Karen are openly questioning their father’s account of their mother’s absence this past three decades, Jimmy Black still has a place in their lives.

“No matter what, he is still going to be my father,” Scott Black said. “He is a person. I can’t throw him out on the street with no place to go.”

SageDad:

--- Quote ---Although both Scott and Karen are openly questioning their father’s account of their mother’s absence this past three decades, Jimmy Black still has a place in their lives.

“No matter what, he is still going to be my father,” Scott Black said. “He is a person. I can’t throw him out on the street with no place to go.”

--- End quote ---

Perhaps not, but it sure would be nice for law enforcement to throw him in jail as punishment for his crimes and a deterrent to future would-be child abductors.

UD_student:

--- Quote from: SageDad on August 09, 2010, 12:48:52 PM ---Perhaps not, but it sure would be nice for law enforcement to throw him in jail as punishment for his crimes and a deterrent to future would-be child abductors.

--- End quote ---

I agree with you wholeheartedly on that one. It is shameful that any parent can be rewarded by keeping their children from the children's mother or father. Perhaps the statute of limitations would have expired (not that it would have been applied anyway)? I have no idea what it is for parental child abduction. On a crime that causes such grief, I would hope it was long, but I can think of other heinous crimes where it would have long since expired (like rape).

StrngConviction:
Very crazy story for sure .

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